A burrowing mud shrimp (Callianassa subterranea)

Distribution data supplied by the Ocean Biodiversity Information System (OBIS). To interrogate UK data visit the NBN Atlas.Map Help

Summary

Description

Callianassa subterranea is a burrowing prawn up to 4 cm long. The body is elongate with a small carapace and short rostrum and is relatively soft (i.e. not strongly calcified). The chelipeds (claws) are massive and unequal and are larger in males than females of the same carapace length. The species is pale puce, sometimes darker, in colour.

Recorded distribution in Britain and Ireland

Recorded distribution is limited to the south coast of Britain, west coast of Scotland and a single site in the Kenmare River area, in southern Ireland. However, Callianassa subterranea is likely to be more widespread than records suggest.

Global distribution

The species has a geographical distribution from the Mediterranean Sea to the coast of Norway.

Habitat

The species creates complex burrow systems in sandy mud sediments from the lower shore to the shallow sublittoral. The burrows, which have been recorded up to 81 cm deep, consist of a multi-branched network of tunnels connected to several inhalant shafts, each terminating in a funnel shaped opening to the surface.

Depth range

From low water to -50m

Identifying features

  • Rostrum minute.
  • Carpus and propodus of the large first pereopod as wide as long, appearing almost square. The joint between carpus and merus wasp-waisted.
  • Chelipeds massive and unequal, the finger-tips not crossing markedly.
  • Third maxillipeds slender and leg-like, not forming an operculum.
  • Telson as long as uropods.

Additional information

There are two common species of Callianassid prawns in Europe: Callianassa subterranea and Callianassa tyrrhena. Callianassa tyrrhena is larger in size, up to 67mm and is whitish in colour with pink or blue spots, sometimes greenish grey. Ingle (1997) reports Callianassa tyrrena to be a synonym of Callianassa subterranea.

Listed by

- none -

Biology review

Taxonomy

LevelScientific nameCommon name
PhylumArthropoda
ClassMalacostraca
OrderDecapoda
FamilyCallianassidae
GenusCallianassa
Authority(Montagu, 1808)
Recent Synonyms

Biology

ParameterData
Typical abundanceModerate density
Male size rangeup to 40mm
Male size at maturity
Female size rangeCarapace length 7.0 - 7.5mm
Female size at maturity
Growth formArticulate
Growth rateSee additional information below
Body flexibilityHigh (greater than 45 degrees)
Mobility
Characteristic feeding methodSub-surface deposit feeder
Diet/food source
Typically feeds onOrganic content of sediment particles.
Sociability
Environmental positionInfaunal
DependencyIndependent.
SupportsHost

the parasitic isopod Ione thoracica.

Is the species harmful?

Biology information

Growth rates

Rowden & Jones (1994) estimated that Callianassa subterranea could achieve a carapace length of 6.5 mm by the end of the first year. They noted that other estimates were similar and cited growth estimates of 6 mm, 8 mm and 9.5 mm in carapace length in the first year.

Feeding method

Callianassa subterranea is a sub-surface deposit feeder. Feeding takes place entirely within the burrow and once a burrow is established, much of the subsequent burrowing activity is for the purpose of obtaining food. Although it has been suggested that Callianassa subterranea is also a facultative filter-feeder (Nickell & Atkinson, 1995) and may 'garden' bacteria within its burrow detailed behavioural studies reveal the species to be a genuine deposit feeder (Stamhuis et al., 1996). Sediment is processed before ingesting and so contains a larger silt fraction than the sediment.

Sociability

The density of Callianassa subterranea individuals varies between 2 and 60 shrimps per m² (Künitzer et al., 1992). Although the population density of Callianassa subterreanea is often high, Rowden & Jones (1994) observed individual shrimps to be aggressive and intolerant of each other. The role of such aggressive behaviour may be important to the regulation of population density. It is also suggested that shrimp population density may control aspects of burrow morphology. In the laboratory, Callianassa subterranea showed self-inhibiting burrow construction. Burrows were smaller when individuals were present in high densities (Rowden & Jones, 1995).

Parasitism

The bopyrid isopod Ione thoracica resides in the branchial chamber beneath the carapace of Callianassa subterranea. A significant enlargement of the carapace allows for easy identification of those individuals suffering from such parasitism. Potential effects of bopyrid infestation are the prevention or reduction of maturation of eggs in females and reduction of testes and slenderization of the primary chelae in males (Rowden & Jones, 1994).

Habitat preferences

ParameterData
Physiographic preferencesOpen coast, Offshore seabed, Strait or Sound, Sea loch or Sea lough, Enclosed coast or Embayment
Biological zone preferencesLower circalittoral, Lower infralittoral, Sublittoral fringe, Upper circalittoral, Upper infralittoral
Substratum / habitat preferencesMuddy sand, Sandy mud
Tidal strength preferencesModerately strong 1 to 3 knots (0.5-1.5 m/sec.), Very weak (negligible), Weak < 1 knot (<0.5 m/sec.)
Wave exposure preferencesExtremely sheltered, Sheltered, Ultra sheltered, Very sheltered
Salinity preferencesFull (30-40 psu)
Depth rangeFrom low water to -50m
Other preferencesNo text entered
Migration PatternNon-migratory or resident

Habitat Information

  • Callianassa subterranea is likely to be more widespread than records of adults suggest. Many observations of the deep-burrowing habit of the species indicate that the adults will usually be unavailable to conventional benthic sampling equipment (Atkinson & Nash, 1990) because of the depth of the shrimps burrows.
  • Burrows in mud are relatively simple and deep (30-81cm) compared to those in sandier sediments which tend to be shallow and complex (Rowden & Jones, 1997). These differences may be related to the associated food content of the substratum.

Life history

Adult characteristics

ParameterData
Reproductive typeGonochoristic (dioecious)
Reproductive frequency Biannual episodic
Fecundity (number of eggs)No information
Generation time
Age at maturity1 year
SeasonInsufficient information
Life span2-3 years

Larval characteristics

ParameterData
Larval/propagule type-
Larval/juvenile development Planktotrophic
Duration of larval stage1-2 months
Larval dispersal potential No information
Larval settlement periodInsufficient information

Life history information

  • Female Callianassa subterranea brood eggs on their pleopods.
  • Most sexually mature females collected from the southern North Sea were ovigerous in July and August suggesting a summer breeding season for Callianassa subterranea. The proportion of ovigerous females declined during April and September, and no females with eggs were collected in October (Rowden & Jones, 1994). Approximately one month after the peak occurrence of ovigerous females, post larval abundance is highest, implying that newly-hatched larvae have about four weeks in the plankton before being recruited to the benthic population. However, post larvae were also relatively abundant in April which supports evidence from Witbaard & Duineveld (1989) of a double reproductive cycle. Large or old females (9 mm carapace length, 2 years old) were ovigerous in February and post larvae common in April. Lindley (1987) found no Callianassa subterranea larvae in the North Sea plankton for late winter or early spring which also supports the suggestion of a double reproductive cycle. However, Rowden & Jones (1994) suggest that the absence of larvae between the two peaks may be because Callianassa subterranea adopts an alternative life-history strategy of direct benthic development during this period. Such benthic larval development has been observed for Callianassa kraussi in South Africa
  • Rowden & Jones (1995) observed the influence of the sex of Callianassa subterranea upon burrow structure. Resin casts of burrows produced by females had consistently fewer surface openings than those of males. The reason for this difference is unknown.

Sensitivity reviewHow is sensitivity assessed?

Physical pressures

Use / to open/close text displayed

 IntoleranceRecoverabilitySensitivityEvidence / Confidence
Substratum loss [Show more]

Substratum loss

Benchmark. All of the substratum occupied by the species or biotope under consideration is removed. A single event is assumed for sensitivity assessment. Once the activity or event has stopped (or between regular events) suitable substratum remains or is deposited. Species or community recovery assumes that the substratum within the habitat preferences of the original species or community is present. Further details

Evidence

Substratum loss will also involve loss of the species and so intolerance is high. The species is iteroparous, possibly breeding twice a year, producing planktonic larvae and so recovery is expected to be rapid. Immigration of adults can also aid recovery.
High High Moderate High
Smothering [Show more]

Smothering

Benchmark. All of the population of a species or an area of a biotope is smothered by sediment to a depth of 5 cm above the substratum for one month. Impermeable materials, such as concrete, oil, or tar, are likely to have a greater effect. Further details.

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea lives in burrows deep in sandy mud habitats and so will not be sensitive to smothering by 5 cm of sediment. However, the species may be intolerant of smothering by other materials, particularly oil.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Not relevant
Increase in suspended sediment [Show more]

Increase in suspended sediment

Benchmark. An arbitrary short-term, acute change in background suspended sediment concentration e.g., a change of 100 mg/l for one month. The resultant light attenuation effects are addressed under turbidity, and the effects of rapid settling out of suspended sediment are addressed under smothering. Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is a deep (burrows up to 81cm deep) burrowing species so changes in suspended sediment are unlikely to have a direct effect. However, levels of suspended sediment and siltation may affect food availability although at the benchmark period of 1 month this is unlikely to be significant. For example, a decrease in suspended sediment and siltation may reduce the amount of organic sediment that settles on the seabed reducing food availability for Callianassa subterranea. In the North Sea, where sediments have a low organic content Rowden & Jones (1997) found Callianassa subterranea had to construct much more complex burrows to support their energetic costs. However, reduced organic content is unlikely to affect the survival or viability of the population and so the species is reported as tolerant of changes in suspended sediment.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Decrease in suspended sediment [Show more]

Decrease in suspended sediment

Benchmark. An arbitrary short-term, acute change in background suspended sediment concentration e.g., a change of 100 mg/l for one month. The resultant light attenuation effects are addressed under turbidity, and the effects of rapid settling out of suspended sediment are addressed under smothering. Further details

Evidence

No information
Desiccation [Show more]

Desiccation

  1. A normally subtidal, demersal or pelagic species including intertidal migratory or under-boulder species is continuously exposed to air and sunshine for one hour.
  2. A normally intertidal species or community is exposed to a change in desiccation equivalent to a change in position of one vertical biological zone on the shore, e.g., from upper eulittoral to the mid eulittoral or from sublittoral fringe to lower eulittoral for a period of one year. Further details.

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is a soft bodied animal that is likely to have little protection from desiccation. In the intertidal the species is only found on the very low shore where the sediment becomes emersed occasionally at very low spring tides. The sandy mud type habitats in which Callianassa subterranea lives are likely to retain water. Therefore, only a significant increase in desiccation would result in the mortality of some individuals at the highest point on the shore, depressing the upper limit of mud shrimp populations. However, Callianassa subterranea is predominantly a subtidal species living in habitats where desiccation is not a relevant factor. Therefore, the majority of the population are not likely to be affected so intolerance to desiccation is assessed as low. On return to normal conditions recovery will probably be very high because adults can migrate from adjacent habitats such as sediments below low tide.
Low Very high Very Low Moderate
Increase in emergence regime [Show more]

Increase in emergence regime

Benchmark. A one hour change in the time covered or not covered by the sea for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is predominantly a subtidal species living in habitats where emergence is not a relevant factor. In the intertidal it is only found on the very low shore where the sediment becomes emersed only at very low spring tides. Therefore, an increase in emergence may result in the mortality of some individuals depressing the upper limit of mud shrimp populations. Intolerance to increased emergence is therefore, assessed as low. On return to normal conditions recovery will probably be very high because adults can migrate from adjacent habitats such as sediments below low tide.
Low Very high Very Low Moderate
Decrease in emergence regime [Show more]

Decrease in emergence regime

Benchmark. A one hour change in the time covered or not covered by the sea for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

No information
Increase in water flow rate [Show more]

Increase in water flow rate

A change of two categories in water flow rate (view glossary) for 1 year, for example, from moderately strong (1-3 knots) to very weak (negligible). Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea lives in sandy mud or muddy sand habitats where water flow rates are likely to be low. Increases in flow rate will change the surface layer of the sediment structure, removing the fine mud element to leave the coarser particles behind. A long term increase (i.e. the benchmark level of one year) will change the nature of the top layers of sediment, becoming coarser and thus unsuitable for Callianassa subterranea to live in. However, the species is very deep burrowing so if sediments below the substratum surface continue to be muddy Callianassa subterranea populations will most likely survive. Intolerance is therefore assessed as low. The species is iteroparous, possibly breeding twice a year, producing a planktonic larvae and so recovery is expected to be rapid on return to normal conditions.
Low High Low Moderate
Decrease in water flow rate [Show more]

Decrease in water flow rate

A change of two categories in water flow rate (view glossary) for 1 year, for example, from moderately strong (1-3 knots) to very weak (negligible). Further details

Evidence

No information
Increase in temperature [Show more]

Increase in temperature

  1. A short-term, acute change in temperature; e.g., a 5°C change in the temperature range for three consecutive days. This definition includes ‘short-term’ thermal discharges.
  2. A long-term, chronic change in temperature; e.g. a 2°C change in the temperature range for a year. This definition includes ‘long term’ thermal discharges.

For intertidal species or communities, the range of temperatures includes the air temperature regime for that species or community. Further details

Evidence

No information was found on the upper or lower limits of Callianassa subterranea tolerance to temperature changes. However, the species occurs from Norway to the Mediterranean and so most likely tolerates a range of temperatures. In the North Sea, for example, Callianassa subterranea lives in water temperatures which vary between 6 and 15°C (Rowden et al., 1998). The species is probably able to tolerate long term changes in temperature although growth and fecundity is likely to be affected. Short term changes may be more harmful. Intolerance is assessed as low. The species is iteroparous, possibly breeding twice a year, producing a planktonic larvae and so recovery is expected to be rapid. Immigration of adults can also aid recovery.
Low High Low Low
Decrease in temperature [Show more]

Decrease in temperature

  1. A short-term, acute change in temperature; e.g., a 5°C change in the temperature range for three consecutive days. This definition includes ‘short-term’ thermal discharges.
  2. A long-term, chronic change in temperature; e.g. a 2°C change in the temperature range for a year. This definition includes ‘long term’ thermal discharges.

For intertidal species or communities, the range of temperatures includes the air temperature regime for that species or community. Further details

Evidence

No information
Increase in turbidity [Show more]

Increase in turbidity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., two categories of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one month, such as from medium to extreme turbidity.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., one category of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one year, such as from low to medium turbidity. Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is a deposit feeder and therefore tolerate changes in light attenuation resulting from increased or decreased turbidity. The species also lives at depths of up to 50 m where there is little light and so intolerance is assessed as tolerant.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Not relevant
Decrease in turbidity [Show more]

Decrease in turbidity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., two categories of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one month, such as from medium to extreme turbidity.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., one category of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one year, such as from low to medium turbidity. Further details

Evidence

No information
Increase in wave exposure [Show more]

Increase in wave exposure

A change of two ranks on the wave exposure scale (view glossary) e.g., from Exposed to Extremely exposed for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is predominantly a subtidal species living in sheltered muddy habitats where increased wave exposure is likely to remove fine sediments and may disturb normally stable habitats. In the intertidal, the species is found on the very low shore where the sediment becomes emersed only at very low spring tides. In these areas an increase in wave exposure would result in erosion of the sediment. For example, large areas of surface mud were removed from Severn estuary by exposure to prevailing gales and its large tidal range (Ferns 1983 cited in Elliot et al., 1998). Increased wave exposure for a period of a year may therefore, depress the upper limit of the population and may affect deeper populations. However, since the majority of Callianassa subterranea populations are not likely to be affected, intolerance is assessed as low.
Low High Low High
Decrease in wave exposure [Show more]

Decrease in wave exposure

A change of two ranks on the wave exposure scale (view glossary) e.g., from Exposed to Extremely exposed for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

No information
Noise [Show more]

Noise

  1. Underwater noise levels e.g., the regular passing of a 30-metre trawler at 100 metres or a working cutter-suction transfer dredge at 100 metres for one month during important feeding or breeding periods.
  2. Atmospheric noise levels e.g., the regular passing of a Boeing 737 passenger jet 300 metres overhead for one month during important feeding or breeding periods. Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is unlikely to be sensitive to noise although it is likely to respond to vibrations.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Not relevant
Visual presence [Show more]

Visual presence

Benchmark. The continuous presence for one month of moving objects not naturally found in the marine environment (e.g., boats, machinery, and humans) within the visual envelope of the species or community under consideration. Further details

Evidence

The eyes of Callianassa subterranea are small but may enable the species to avoid predation and so it is probably sensitive to movement. However, the shrimp remains in its burrow and is rarely seen at the surface so is unlikely to be sensitive to the factor.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Abrasion & physical disturbance [Show more]

Abrasion & physical disturbance

Benchmark. Force equivalent to a standard scallop dredge landing on or being dragged across the organism. A single event is assumed for assessment. This factor includes mechanical interference, crushing, physical blows against, or rubbing and erosion of the organism or habitat of interest. Where trampling is relevant, the evidence and trampling intensity will be reported in the rationale. Further details.

Evidence

The body of Callianassa subterranea is not highly calcified and is quite soft so that it is likely to be easily damaged by abrasion or physical disturbance. However, the factor is not relevant because the species rarely leaves its burrows under normal circumstances and burrows are deep enough, sometimes up to 80 cm, to avoid the factor. Thus physical disturbance like trawling is unlikely to affect Callianassa subterranea to any great extent. Atkinson (1989) for example, found no evidence of an effect of trawling on burrowing species in Loch Sween. Individuals may occasionally be displaced from burrow openings by towed gear (Atkinson, 1989). However, the species will be able to re-establish burrow openings if these become blocked so recovery would be immediate.
Not relevant Not relevant Not relevant High
Displacement [Show more]

Displacement

Benchmark. Removal of the organism from the substratum and displacement from its original position onto a suitable substratum. A single event is assumed for assessment. Further details

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea has low intolerance to displacement, such as that caused by a passing trawl that does not kill the species but throws it into suspension, because it can reburrow into suitable substrata.
Low Immediate Not sensitive High

Chemical pressures

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 IntoleranceRecoverabilitySensitivityEvidence / Confidence
Synthetic compound contamination [Show more]

Synthetic compound contamination

Sensitivity is assessed against the available evidence for the effects of contaminants on the species (or closely related species at low confidence) or community of interest. For example:

  • evidence of mass mortality of a population of the species or community of interest (either short or long term) in response to a contaminant will be ranked as high sensitivity;
  • evidence of reduced abundance, or extent of a population of the species or community of interest (either short or long term) in response to a contaminant will be ranked as intermediate sensitivity;
  • evidence of sub-lethal effects or reduced reproductive potential of a population of the species or community of interest will be assessed as low sensitivity.

The evidence used is stated in the rationale. Where the assessment can be based on a known activity then this is stated. The tolerance to contaminants of species of interest will be included in the rationale when available; together with relevant supporting material. Further details.

Evidence

Bryan & Gibbs (1991) report that crabs appear to be relatively resistant to TBT although some deformity of regenerated limbs has been observed. In the early 1960's in Washington, experimental application of a broad range of pesticides was tested for use on shrimp-infested oyster grounds identified carbaryl (1-napthol n-methyl carbamate; sold under the trade name Sevin®) to be an effective method to control burrowing shrimp (Feldman et al., 2000). Carbaryl, a non-persistent organocarbamate pesticide that is extremely toxic to arthropods, was applied at 9kg/ha to remove shrimps from oyster grounds.
High High Moderate High
Heavy metal contamination [Show more]

Heavy metal contamination

Evidence

Crompton (1997) reports that the concentrations above which mortality of crustaceans can occur is 0.01-0.1mg/l for mercury, copper and cadmium, 0.1-1mg/l for zinc, arsenic and nickel and 1-10mg/l for lead and chromium. Crustaceans are generally regarded as being more intolerant of cadmium than other groups (McLusky, 1986). Ahsanullah et al. (1981) report LC50 values of 1.2mg/l Zn, 0.5mg/l Cd and 0.2mg/l Cu for Callianassa australiensis. The higher toxicity of copper to Callianassa australiensis agrees with toxicity information reported for other crustaceans by Bryan (1971). Callianassa tyrrhena bioaccumulates mercury and cadmium in its tissues (Thaker & Haritos, 1991(a); Thaker & Haritos, 1991(b)). However, crustaceans in general are less intolerant of most heavy metals than annelid worms and so intolerance has been assessed as intermediate. On return to normal conditions recovery should be good because Callianassa subterranea has planktonic larvae and reproduces several times a year.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Hydrocarbon contamination [Show more]

Hydrocarbon contamination

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea is very intolerant of oil pollution. In the North Sea, abundance of the species was significantly reduced up to and over 1km away from the site of oil drilling one year after drilling ceased (Daan et al., 1992). Jackson (1985) showed that the survival capacity of eggs and larvae of the South African burrowing shrimp Callianassa kraussi in the laboratory is severely reduced by exposure to sublethal levels (0.77ppm) of a water-soluble fraction of Qatar crude oil. Intolerance of the species is therefore assessed as High.
High High Moderate High
Radionuclide contamination [Show more]

Radionuclide contamination

Evidence

Hughes & Atkinson(1997) reports that Callianassa subterranea was the only major sediment bioturbator found in radionuclide contaminated sediments close to the Sellafield nuclear processing plant in the Irish Sea. It seems likely therefore, that the species has some tolerance to radionuclide pollution and intolerance is assessed as Intermediate.
Intermediate High Low Low
Changes in nutrient levels [Show more]

Changes in nutrient levels

Evidence

The species is found in sediments with a range of organic content. In the soft, organically enriched sediments (typical organic carbon values of 3.6 - 7.8%) of Loch Sween, a sea loch in Scotland, Callianassa subterranea was present as a significant megafaunal burrower (Atkinson, 1989). The maximum depth of the species burrows has been recorded as 86cm, which Nickell & Atkinson (1995) suggest is an underestimate, indicates a nutritional requirement for sub-surface organic matter. In the North Sea, where sediments have a low organic content Rowden & Jones (1997) found Callianassa subterranea had to construct much more complex burrows to support their energetic costs.
Low Very high Very Low High
Increase in salinity [Show more]

Increase in salinity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., a change of two categories from the MNCR salinity scale for one week (view glossary) such as from full to reduced.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., a change of one category from the MNCR salinity scale for one year (view glossary) such as from reduced to low. Further details.

Evidence

Although Callianassa subterranea can be found in the intertidal, it is generally found well down the shore where large salinity changes are not likely to occur. The species is not recorded from estuaries where salinity is variable. Callianassa subterranea is stenohaline, tolerating only a narrow range of salinities, and is therefore likely to be highly intolerant of salinity changes at the level of the benchmark.
High High Moderate Moderate
Decrease in salinity [Show more]

Decrease in salinity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., a change of two categories from the MNCR salinity scale for one week (view glossary) such as from full to reduced.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., a change of one category from the MNCR salinity scale for one year (view glossary) such as from reduced to low. Further details.

Evidence

No information
Changes in oxygenation [Show more]

Changes in oxygenation

Benchmark.  Exposure to a dissolved oxygen concentration of 2 mg/l for one week. Further details.

Evidence

In its natural habitat, even if the near-bottom water is oxygenated, most of the time Callianassa subterranea lives in hypoxic or even anoxic conditions (Powilleit & Graf, 1996). In laboratory experiments the species survived for up to five days under anoxic conditions at 6°C (Powilleit & Graf, 1996). Mud shrimps are among the few species to survive the low oxygen partial pressures and high sulphide levels in the vicinity of fish cages in sea lochs (Atkinson, 1987). The species has several adaptations that allow it to survive in low oxygen environments: a low rate of oxygen consumption, large gill areas and possession of a respiratory pigment with a high oxygen affinity (Astall et al., 1997; Taylor et al., 2000). Intolerance is therefore, recorded as low. Laboratory experiments on Callianassa subterranea have shown the species also has a high tolerance to sulphide (Johns et al., 1997).
Low Very high Very Low High

Biological pressures

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 IntoleranceRecoverabilitySensitivityEvidence / Confidence
Introduction of microbial pathogens/parasites [Show more]

Introduction of microbial pathogens/parasites

Benchmark. Sensitivity can only be assessed relative to a known, named disease, likely to cause partial loss of a species population or community. Further details.

Evidence

No information on diseases of Callianassa subterranea was found.
No information No information No information Not relevant
Introduction of non-native species [Show more]

Introduction of non-native species

Sensitivity assessed against the likely effect of the introduction of alien or non-native species in Britain or Ireland. Further details.

Evidence

No alien or non-native species are known to compete with Callianassa subterranea.
Not relevant Not relevant Not relevant Not relevant
Extraction of this species [Show more]

Extraction of this species

Benchmark. Extraction removes 50% of the species or community from the area under consideration. Sensitivity will be assessed as 'intermediate'. The habitat remains intact or recovers rapidly. Any effects of the extraction process on the habitat itself are addressed under other factors, e.g. displacement, abrasion and physical disturbance, and substratum loss. Further details.

Evidence

The species is unlikely to be extracted for commercial purposes although Ingle (1997) reports that a very similar species, Callianassa tyrrhena, is occasionally trawled by fishing boats and used as fish bait by anglers. Recovery is likely to be high because the species is iteroparous, possibly breeding twice a year, produces planktonic larvae and can also migrate from unaffected areas.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Extraction of other species [Show more]

Extraction of other species

Benchmark. A species that is a required host or prey for the species under consideration (and assuming that no alternative host exists) or a keystone species in a biotope is removed. Any effects of the extraction process on the habitat itself are addressed under other factors, e.g. displacement, abrasion and physical disturbance, and substratum loss. Further details.

Evidence

Callianassa subterranea does not depend on other species for prey or as a host.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive High

Additional information

Importance review

Policy/legislation

- no data -

Status

Non-native

ParameterData
Native-
Origin-
Date Arrived-

Importance information

  • The opening of the burrows of Callianassa subterranea provide temporary refuge for fish such as the black goby Gobius niger, Pomatoschistus minutus. Occasional errant polychaetes, particularly polynoid worms, inhabit the burrows (Nickell & Atkinson, 1995).
  • Thalassinidean shrimps can be a pest of oyster fisheries. Oyster survival and growth is affected indirectly through sediment disturbance. As the shrimps burrow through the mud constructing their extensive burrows, sediment compaction is reduced to the point that oysters growing directly on the benthos sink into the unconsolidated mud and settling larvae and spat and particularly vulnerable (Feldman et al., 2000). Ghost shrimp however, have a greater impact than mud shrimp because the level of sediment expulsion is greater.
  • Callianassa subterranea is likely to be more abundant than records of adults suggest. Many observations of the deep-burrowing habit of the species indicate that the adults will usually be unavailable to conventional benthic sampling equipment (Atkinson & Nash, 1990) because of the depth of burrows, which can be up to 81cm deep (Rowden & Jones, 1995).

Bibliography

  1. Ahsanullah, M., Negilski, D.S. & Mobley, M.C., 1981. Toxicity of zinc, cadmium and copper to the shrimp Callianassa australiensis. I. Effects of individual metals. Marine Biology, 64, 299-304.

  2. Astall, C.A., Anderson, S.J. & Taylor, A.C., 1997. Comparative studies of the branchial morphology, gill area and gill ultrastructure of some thalassinidean mud-shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Thalassinidea). Journal of Zoology, 241, 665-688.

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Datasets

  1. NBN (National Biodiversity Network) Atlas. Available from: https://www.nbnatlas.org.

  2. OBIS (Ocean Biodiversity Information System),  2023. Global map of species distribution using gridded data. Available from: Ocean Biogeographic Information System. www.iobis.org. Accessed: 2023-12-10

  3. South East Wales Biodiversity Records Centre, 2018. SEWBReC Myriapods, Isopods, and allied species (South East Wales). Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/rvxsqs accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-02.

Citation

This review can be cited as:

Hill, J.M. 2005. Callianassa subterranea A burrowing mud shrimp. In Tyler-Walters H. Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Reviews, [on-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. [cited 10-12-2023]. Available from: https://marlin.ac.uk/species/detail/1428

Last Updated: 24/11/2005